The JCCC is closed to the public to help reduce the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19). Learn more
Please read JCCC Vaccine Policy Announcement from the board
To support the JCCC during this time of closure, click here

Interview with Arthur Ikeda

Title
Interview with Arthur Ikeda
Accession number
2011.013
Interviewer
Lisa Uyeda
Videographer
Lisa Uyeda
Date of Interview
Language
English
Description

Arthur Ikeda talks about growing up in Vancouver, BC on Powell Street. He talks about attending Japanese Language School. During WWII, Arthur and his family were removed to Hastings Park and subsequently interned in Tashme Internment Camp in BC where his father passed away from a stroke. After that, Arthur had to leave school to take care of his young siblings. He talks about the living conditions, activities, and food in Hastings Park and Tashme. His family also went to Rosebery and then New Denver. After the end of WWII, Roy relocated to Toronto, ON in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood. He worked for a Jewish cleaning company that hired other Japanese Canadians as well. Eventually, Arthur would go on to owning his own business in co-owning and managing a building. He talks about New Year traditions in his family.

 
Format
Videotape
Video File
Length of Interview
2 hr 39 min
Period
Pre War
Post War
World War II
Event
Redress
World War II
Relocation
Forced Removal
Attack on Pearl Harbour
Internment
Location
Powell Street, Vancouver, BC
Tashme, BC
New Denver, BC
New Westminster, BC
Toronto, ON
Kaslo, BC
Topic
language
family
housing
employment
education
housing
canneries
farming
fishing
religion
Jewish community
travel
Buddhism
family
food
deportation
immigration
bathhouse
gardening
clothing
children
marriage
transportation
Number of Physical Tapes
3
Permission
For uses other than research or private study, researchers must submit a Request for Permission to Publish, Exhibit or Broadcast form.
Citation
Arthur Ikeda, interview by Lisa Uyeda, January 13, 2011, 2011.013, Sedai: The Japanese Canadian Legacy Project Collection, Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre.